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Ye Mariners All

  • (Trad)

    Ye mariners all as ye pass by
    Come in and drink when you are dry
    Come spend my lads your money brisk
    And pop your nose in a jug of this

    Ye tipplers all as you pass by
    Come in and drink when you are dry
    Come spend my lads your money brisk
    And pop your nose in a jug of this

    Ye tipplers all if ye've half a crown
    You're welcome all for to sit down
    Come in sit down think not amiss
    To pop your nose in a jug of this

    Oh now I'm old and can scarcely crawl
    I've a long grey beard and a head that's bald
    Crown my desire fulfil my bliss
    A pretty girl and a jug of this

    Oh when I'm in my grave and dead
    And all my sorrows are past and fled
    Transform me then into a fish
    And let me swim in a jug of this

    Repeat 1

    (as sung by Martin Carthy)

Susannes Folksong-Notizen

  • [1959:] The raffish words of this song were in print in 1838 or shortly after, in one of a set of miniature penny song-books called 'Little Warblers', published by Ryle of Seven Dials, London. The handsome melody is a variant of a tune used for the well-known Died for Love. Barratt prints a Wiltshire version called A Jug of This [...]. Hammond at first understood Mrs Russell to sing 'Ye mourners all' but later presumed that she meant 'mariners'. Mrs Russell's words were fragmentary, and Hammond filled out the text [see above] from a version supplied by W. Haines 'of Halfway House between Sherborne and Yeovil'. (EFS125)

  • [1965:] An example of an old tune fitted to more modern words. [...] Barrett noted that it had been printed in 1857 but suggested that the song might be older. (Notes 'Martin Carthy')

  • [1976:] A song collected by the Hammond brothers from Mrs Marina Russell of Upwey in Dorset, a singer who had an amazingly rich store of tunes. As in other drinking songs the themes of old age, death and drink intermingle. Surely this is one of the greatest drinking songs England ever produced? (Vic Gammon, notes 'The Tale of Ale')

  • [1994:] Written down by the Hammond brothers in the early 1900s [...]. The brothers first thought that [Mrs Russell] had sung 'mourners', and a song from inside the pub to a funeral cortege telling them to lighten up does have a certain something, but later decided that they had in fact heard her say 'mariners'. (Martin Carthy, notes 'Waterson:Carthy')

Quelle: England

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aktualisiert am 14.09.2000